Length: Approximately 750-1000 wordsPutting it all together: Food, social class, and everyday community life in the DMVIn the earlier steps of this Doing Sociology Assignment, you looked into what sociological research tells us about food culture and immigrant communities, then you turned to explore demographic and residential patterns across the D.C.-Maryland-Virginia (DMV) metro area, and most recently, you visited and took field notes at an international grocery store or cultural site. In this final step, you will write a brief paper wrapping up the project.*All notes and papers are attached below.Your overall goal for this paper is to discuss what you learned about the DMV metro area from this entire assignment. You’ll want to think about how the different steps in this project have helped to answer the following questions: Who lives here in the DMV? Where do people live? (think about residential settlement patterns and the composition of your study communities (the zip-codes))What are some of the differences you observed during your site visit when compared to other experiences you’ve had in a supermarket or cultural venue? What similarities were there? What, if anything, do your observations say about diversity or social inequality in the DMV?What’s missing? What types of data or information would you need to form a fuller picture of your study communities? In answering these questions, you’ll need to incorporate three sources of data:The field notes you a wrote up following your observations at the international grocery store (Attached Below)Demographic and residential data from the US Census Bureau about the neighborhood where the site you visited was located.Sociological concepts and ideas that can help us to understand social and economic life for the various communities. that make up the DMV Include a bibliography containing two academic sources (either peer-reviewed articles or a book) that could be useful resources for learning more about the communities of the greater DMV. Use ASA style, of course.Length: Approximately 750-1000 wordsPutting it all together: Food, social class, and everyday community life in the DMVIn the earlier steps of this Doing Sociology Assignment, you looked into what sociological research tells us about food culture and immigrant communities, then you turned to explore demographic and residential patterns across the D.C.-Maryland-Virginia (DMV) metro area, and most recently, you visited and took field notes at an international grocery store or cultural site. In this final step, you will write a brief paper wrapping up the project.Your overall goal for this paper is to discuss what you learned about the DMV metro area from this entire assignment. You’ll want to think about how the different steps in this project have helped to answer the following questions: Who lives here in the DMV? Where do people live? (think about residential settlement patterns and the composition of your study communities (the zip-codes))What are some of the differences you observed during your site visit when compared to other experiences you’ve had in a supermarket or cultural venue? What similarities were there? What, if anything, do your observations say about diversity or social inequality in the DMV?What’s missing? What types of data or information would you need to form a fuller picture of your study communities? In answering these questions, you’ll need to incorporate three sources of data:The field notes you a wrote up following your observations at the international grocery storeDemographic and residential data from the US Census Bureau about the neighborhood where the site you visited was located. (Store I visited was German Gourmet)Sociological concepts and ideas that can help us to understand social and economic life for the various communities. that make up the DMV Include a bibliography containing two academic sources (either peer-reviewed articles or a book) that could be useful resources for learning more about the communities of the greater DMV. Use ASA style, of course.
doing_sociology.docx
place_and_experience__worksheet.docx
sociology_field_notes.docx
Unformatted Attachment Preview
Doing Sociology – Step #1
Article
Citation
Research
Methods
&
Data
Moffat, Charlene, Bruce. 2017.
“Cultural
dimensions
of
food
insecurity among immigrants and
refugees.”Human
Organization;
Spring 76(1): 15-27.
The study used an explanatory research
design. The study adopted three
independent
variables;
food
availability, food access and food use
as indicators of food security. More so,
conceptualization of the study assumed
that food availability would be
determined by whether or not refugees
and immigrants had enough food to
satisfy their hunger, access would be
determined by having resources to get
food and food use would be determined
by the ability of immigrants and
refugees to eat accessed food. The
study used primary data that was
collected through interviews of both
immigrants and services providers in
terms of acquiring food, cooking it and
actually eating it. More specifically,
service providers provided 22
individual
interviews
for
the
researchers in 2013. The study used a
landscape survey in data collection and
judgment sampling in selecting the
population of the study. It is also worth
noting that the study did invite the
views of relevant bodies in the field of
immigration such as community health
centers as service providers. As for the
immigrants, convenience sampling was
used and 24 immigrants and refugees
were interviewed for data collection.
Farrel, Firebaugh. 2016. “Is immigrant
neighborhood
inequality
less
pronounced in suburban areas?”Social
Science Research 57(1): 161-176.
The study was looking to establish the
relationship between suburbanization
and neighborhood inequality among
immigrants. The study employed
secondary data from the 2008-2012
American community survey censuses.
More specifically, the researcher was
investigating the rate at which
immigrants
settle
in
poorer
neighborhoods as compare to natives.
The study used data from five Asian
countries’ immigrants namely; Korea,
India, China, Vietnam and Philippines.
Five Latin American countries’
immigrants namely; Mexico, El
Salvador, Colombia, Guatemala, and
Honduras. Also, four Caribbean
countries namely; Jamaica, Haiti, Cuba,
and Dominican Republic. The data
collected from the immigrants was
compared to inborn American citizens
from the 366 metropolitan areas in the
United States to establish the
relationship of indicators. More so, a
city and suburban Gini coefficient was
used to establish the direction and level
of correlation between different groups
and neighborhood distribution. The
neighborhoods had different poverty
rates. Also, the study concluded that
majority of immigrants are exposed to
smaller levels of relative neighborhood
disadvantage in the suburbs.
Doing Sociology – Step #1
Main
Argument
The study held the hypothesis that food
availability, food access and use do not
affect food security. The findings of the
study rejected the null hypothesis to
conclude that food availability, access
and use do affect food security. More
so, the study’s perspective of food
security
incorporated
cultural
preferences and effects of not having,
not accessing, and not eating cultural
foods. Cultural foods were considered
in the perspective of both benefits of
eating in terms of nutrition and the
psychological attachment that cultural
foods have to the health and well-being
of both immigrants and refugees.
The findings of the study indicated that
in both urban and suburban areas white
citizens tend to live in neighborhoods
with lower poverty rates. From the
discoveries, although most immigrants
were found to live in neighborhoods
with high poverty rates, an exception of
Korean and Chinese who were at
residential parity with residential whites
was observed. Asians and Indians were
also found to live in neighborhoods with
slightly lower poverty rates than whites
in both urban and suburban areas.
Arlington, VA
Community
Zip code: _20903
Population:
High Income
Density community
Zip code:22182
Foreign Born
Density community
Zip code: 20903
26,596
26,004
37,524
25,338
22983
22,679
24.4%
15.7%
14.7%
Moved in 2015 or later
Moved in 2010-2014
Moved in 2000-2009
Moved in 1990-1999
Moved in 1980-1989
Moved in 1979 or earlier
18,605
3,772
8,754
3,711
1,452
2257
1916
2378
1156
516
994
2461
2241
950
336
313
Speaks only English
87.5%
73.5%
15.0%
Speaks a language
Other than English
12.5%
26.5%
85.0%
6.8%
3.7%
13.7%
610
1701
189
74
1707
37
734
3469
384
66
365
209
251
2530
1828
0
6756
8
2016______________
2000______________
percent change
2000 to 2016 -/+
YEAR HOUSEHOLDER
MOVED INTO UNIT
449
Individuals below
Poverty level
World region of birth of
foreign born:
Europe
Asia
Africa
Oceania
Latin America
North America
Community Insights
The population growth of Arlington has contributed to its growth hence leading to its
rapid expansion. The community is made of different ethnicity groups with their settlement
leading to an increase in housing developments. The percentage of people living below the
poverty level across the neighborhood is significantly low indicating a good economy
development in the community. Despite the difference in ethnicity, English language seems the
dominant language in the community hence communication is made easier.
Running head: FIELD NOTES
Sociology (Field Notes)
FIELD NOTES
2
I visited a dominantly German grocery store and found some interesting sections that
would not ordinarily be found at any local grocery store that serves a higher percentage of
native-born citizens. Throughout the hour I was at the store, I came to the conclusion that
ideology, identity, class, and culture have a fundamental role that the play in shaping individual
preferences. Two sections that caught my attention as they stood out from the rest of the other
sections were the fresh fruits and vegetable section and the pastries and baked goods section.
I.
Fruits and vegetables Section
The store sells a significantly broader goods range compared to those that can be found at
the local grocery store. Unlike what I am used to; fresh and attractive vegetables and fruits, the
store’s vegetable, and fruits section could not be described as being fresh as they looked dull.
The case was the same for the fish and meat sections. Also, the variety of available fruits,
vegetables, and meat was significantly low compared to a typical American grocery store. For
instance, there were no cucumbers and the number of apples was about six. There was also no
salad bar; a factor that can be defined by the low fruits and vegetables variety at the store. In
general, a typical American would consider the quality of goods in this section dismal hence
unreliable. This, I later attributed to culture and established that the German culture does not
value fresh fruits, vegetables, and meat products as much as Americans do. This is a preference
in food consumption that cannot be easily changed as it has been the case over the years.
II.
Pastries and baked foods Section
The section for pastries and baked goods was the most vibrant part of the store. It had all
forms and variety of baked goods like biscuits, brownies, pies, tarts, and crackers among others
in vast flavors, forms and sizes. It was literally the biggest part of the store. This confirmed that
German stores generally have poor quality meats and fresh produce which are a result of their
past culture that majorly supports feeding on calories most especially for survival rather than
enjoyment. Additionally, I noted that most of the shoppers crowded this section and filled their
shopping carts with quite a number of products from the section. The fruits and vegetables
section, on the other hand, was almost empty (in an hour, I counted about 13 shoppers visited the
section), hence I could understand why the store management did not bother to stock up the fresh
fruits and vegetables section.
After comparing the two sections, I noticed that there were no product promotions under
the fruits and vegetables section while the pastries and baked goods sections had more than 10
promotions with more than 5 attendants. The attendants were more like advisors to the clients as
the customers seemed more inquisitive about the products on display as compared to the fresh
fruits and vegetables section that had only 1 attendant who seemed idle due to the less customer
traffic in the section. All the products in these two sections and the store at large were
categorized and arranged as per their price tags from the lowest to the highest, just like any other
grocery store. This goes to classify their customers according to their class.

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