One term paper (6-8 pages, typed, double space) with notes (either MLA or Chicago Style) and bibliography. Students are expected to develop an issue related to the course material. Typical topics include studies of a single work of art, work produced under the patronage of a particular individual or clan, a particular aspect of a single artist’s work, or a carefully delimited discussion about the development of a particular type of subject matter. The grade will be based on clarity of presentation, effectiveness of evidence presented, and soundness of conclusions.Also, you should use 3 or more reference based on the class material, THE ART OF MODERN CHINA, (the reference book are showed in syllabus in the end) or outside internet resources based on our course but they have to be academic and authoritative.And please follow the structure of the sample essay i give to you in first document and choose the 3 art work from the artist call Ren Xiong in the second document of week1 review. And the formats of references and citation please follow the last document.
visual_art_term_paper.docx
week_1_review_fall_2019__2_.ppt
syllabus_vis127c_2019_1_.docx
formats_of_references_and_citations__1_.ppt
Unformatted Attachment Preview
Running head: CHINESE ARTWORK
1
Chinese Artwork
Zihan Chen
Visual Art 127C
Kuiyi Sheng
11/30/2019
CHINESE ARTWORK
2
Chinese Artwork
Introduction
The Chinese culture and heritage span many centuries back, with some elements of
the culture surviving the brunt of time to carry the traditions of the people through
generations. Paintings and art for part of that history, with some of the oldest pictures in the
history of the people of China sill gracing the stands today. This paper interrogates the
purview of the paintings done by one of the most notable Chinese artists of all time, who
plied his trade predominantly in the better part of the 13th century. It begins with an
introduction, which presents an elaborate appreciation of the background of both the artist
and the pieces of art, identifying the specific pieces of art that notably form the artist’s
collection. It then proceeds to the specifics of the pieces of art, identifying and describing the
particular artifacts that make up this collection.
The next phase of the paper is focussed on providing a contextual analysis of the
works, placing the actions within particular social, cultural, political, and economic or even
an environmental context. This is the segment of the paper that also creates an appreciation of
the motivations of the artist, as well as the factors that informed the decision to create art in
the manner or style that he did. Essentially, it forms the crux of the discussion, as the chapter
evaluates the story behind the creation of the piece of art (Powers et al., 1991). It is the
segment that interrogates and connotes to the fact that art cannot occur in a vacuum and
therefore places a context to it.
Finally, the culmination traces the historical aspects with relation to the style of art
used, as well as the historical context to the substance of the artwork. Further, this chapter
connects the art with the prevailing occurrences at the time, giving it even more meaning. It
creates a nexus between the current situations within the environment of the artists. It then
CHINESE ARTWORK
3
culminates in a discussion of the impact that the works of art have had on the cultural, social,
economic, and political aspects of Chinese society.
The Gu Kaizhi paintings
Gu Kaizhi remains one of the most celebrated Chinese artists of all time, having lived
between the years of 344-406 AD. His early life was marred by military duty, where he rose
the ranks to become a royal officer. Away from the battlefield and the war strategy rooms, Gu
preferred to paint and develop pieces of art that reflected his everyday experiences as well as
the state of his society. Further, he also wrote books that were interestingly geared towards
the process of painting and painting theory. His works of art transcended the borders of the
subject, as they talked about an array of issues, with no limit as to the questions they
addressed.
This paper discusses three of the most notable paintings that make up the collection of
Gu, complete with the objective evaluation of their existence. These paintings are the
admonitions of the Instructress to the Palace Ladies, Wise, and Benovelent Women as well as
the Nymph of the Luo River. These works make up some of the most important pieces of art
that were done by this great artist, and the discussion below follows their contextual
existence, their in-depth artistic appreciation as well as the messages that were contained
within these paintings with their contemporary relevance.
The Admonitions of the Instructress to the Palace Ladies
Currently found in the British Museum in London, the painting is one of the essential
pieces of works of the artist. It was created around the time of the Jin Dynasty, with dating
taking it back towards the time between the years 233-300 AD. The painting is essentially a
hand-scroll, comprised of ink and colors on silk, which style of art was predominantly
applied around the fourth century. It is essentially a depiction or illustration of a parody that
CHINESE ARTWORK
4
was written and directed by one Zhang Hua towards that period. It seems to be reprimanding
or instead attacking what appears to be the excessive reaction of the empress in the painting,
which has present in it the instructress guiding the ladies within the walls of the royal palace
on good manners and behavior.
The painting comes in a series of scrolls, which seem to attempt to portray a narrative.
However, over time, the custodians of this masterpiece have had problems with storage and
movement, leading to the loss of up to two of the scrolls in the series. Before finally settling
at the British Museum in London, the painting saw tremendous movement, changing hands
with different custodians over time. Every handler of the picture had a seal or mar to show
their ownership and custody at a particular time, therefore explaining the timestamps and
seals that occur on the current version of the painting. Ultimately during the Opium War,
British Soldiers who had won the battle looted it from the Old Summer Palace and shipped it
to Britain, explaining its occurrence in a land far away from home.
The Nymph of the Luo River
Just like The Admonitions of the Instructress to the Palace Ladies, The Nymph of the
Luo River is a narrative painting that seeks to pass a message through the narration of a tale
in the form of pictures. It is also a painting that was done by Gu Kaizhi in response to the
poem of Cao Zhi, which went by the same title. Copies were made of the original, with each
rendition taking a slightly different tone for the others. Essentially, they all reverberate with
the central theme of the poem but differ superficially on the detail. There are copies all over
the world, with at least four top museums bearing a copy made of the original version.
However, all these copies depict substantial deviations in terms of their structural
composition, with the difference being the fact that they all ascribe to the tenets of the initial
or original document or transcript.
CHINESE ARTWORK
5
The scrolls are read from left to right, a testament to the fact that even in the formative
years of civilization, Chinese literature and literacy bore resembling features to the
contemporary models of writing. The series of paintings narrate about the meeting between
Prince Cao and the nymph of Luo River, in a session that has been the subject of Chinese
folklore for ages. They are in the company of the prince’s servants, who have accompanied
the prince to his mission, alongside horses that enabled their movements. Separating the two
factions is a dragon and a couple of flying geese, which formed the entourage of the nymph.
The narrative continues to give the story of the meeting of the two entities, their transactions,
and finally their parting ways, leaving the Cao crestfallen.
Contextual appreciation
In appreciating the import of the art pieces in question, the paper must look at the
context in which the paintings were done and understand their cultural, political, and even
social connotations. For instance, The Admonitions of the Instructress to the Palace Ladies
provides a narrative on how the royalty lived in the yore days, appreciating the place of
women in the palace setting. The painting also points to the position of the women in society,
because its import was basically to show women how to behave.
The Chinese community has, over the years, portrayed a tendency of toxic patriarchy,
as the men in this society have always had their way, including the fact that they direct
women on what to do. This contention seems to be the primary theme or objective of the
painting, which inadvertently revolves around the place of the women, especially around
authority. The picture also points out to the nature of the social constructs of the Chinese
people from the onset, appreciating the fact that although the men were in charge, the women
also had their perks, and the queen wielded some amount of power in the long run.
CHINESE ARTWORK
6
The second painting is arguably more abundant in context as compared to the first
one, as it captured a host of issues that the first one failed to elicit. For instance, the painting
procures a sense of religiosity as it alludes to a belief system that the people had in the days.
Although it is premised upon the narrative portrayed in Cao’s poems, the crux of the story is
the religious narration of the belief system of the people. The society is characterized as
overly superstitious, with a belief in nymphs and other supernatural deities that provide for
the organization. The fact that the prince goes to seek the counsel or direction of the nymph,
and especially in the Luo River, points to a belief pattern that connotes religiosity (Hay,
1992). Further, the societal segregation and classification are portrayed in the narrative,
considering the way the prince treated the servants who accompanied him to the meeting at
the riverside.
Finally, the two pieces of art have a historical connotation to them, which further
gives them a sense of context. The bits are set in the era of the Jin Dynasty, which also
formed the basis for the background. The political environment of the time provided fodder
for the pieces, considering the subtext developed in the process. For instance, in the second
painting, the painter is categorical on noting that the leader is willing to engage superstition
rather than reason. He was willing to consult a nymph when he had the option of joining his
advisers on the premises of logic. The era of the Jing rulership saw cases of discord in terms
of leadership decisions, which is a testament to the motivation behind the painter’s desire to
depict the political landscape in his way.
Conclusion
All in all, the article above has successfully captured the culture and heritage of the
Chinese people, as depicted in the paintings in question. It has interrogated the purview of the
paintings done by one of the most notable Chinese artists of all time, who plied his trade
CHINESE ARTWORK
predominantly in the better part of the 13th century. It begins with an introduction, which
presents an elaborate appreciation of the background of both the artist and the pieces of art,
identifying the specific pieces of art that notably form the artist’s collection. It then proceeds
to the specifics of the pieces of art, identifying and describing the particular artifacts that
make up this collection. It has also captured the contextual standing of the painting, giving
them more meaning in the process.
7
CHINESE ARTWORK
8
References
Hay, Jonathan. “Ambivalent Icons: Works of Five Chinese Artists Based in the United
States.” Orientations 23, no.7 (July 1992): 37-43.
Powers, Martin. Art and Political Expression in Early China. New Haven and London: Yale
University Press, 1991
Wu, Hung. “The Origins of Chinese Painting (Paleolithic Period to Tang Dynasty),” in Three
Thousand Years of Chinese Painting, eds., Yang Xin and others. New Haven and
London: Yale University Press, 1997. pp. 15-86.
VSI127C
Fall 2019
Week 1
Lecture 1
Shanghai School
of Painting
Map: Coastal China
Jiangnan: The Lower Yangzi area
Zhang Xiong (1803-1886), Eight-leaf Album of Flowers, 1851, leaf
8, 27.8 x 32.8 cm, Osaka Municipal Museum.
Zhu Cheng, Bird-and Flowers, album leaf, 1881, ink and color on
silk, Kyoto National Museum
Ren Xiong (1823-1857) Self-Portrait
Undated, Qing Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and color on paper,
177.4 x 78.5 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)
Self-Portrait
Undated, Qing Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and color on paper,
177.4 x 78.5 cm
Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)
The Ten Myriads
Album of ten leaves
Leaf 1
Ink and color on gold
paper each leaf 26.3 x
20.5 cm
Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)
The Ten Myriads
Undated, Qing Dynasty
Album of ten leaves
Leaf 7
Ink and color on gold
paper each leaf 26.3 x
20.5 cm
Palace Museum,
Beijing
ŌGATA KŌRIN, Irises,
a pair of six-panel byōbu, c. 1701.
Color with gold leaf on paper;
Nezu Museum, Tokyo
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)
The Ten Myriads
Album of ten leaves
Leaf 3
Ink and color on gold paper
each leaf 26.3 x 20.5 cm
Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857), Album After the Poems of Yao Xie, 1850-1851,
album of 120 leaves, ink and color on silk, 27.5 x 32.5 cm 32.5 cm, Palace
Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)Album After the Poems of Yao Xie, 1850-1851
Album of 120 leaves, Ink and color on silk, 27.5 x 32.5 cm 32.5 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857), Album After the Poems of Yao Xie, 18501851, album of 120 leaves, ink and color on silk, 27.5 x 32.5 cm
32.5 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)Album After the Poems of Yao Xie, 1850-1851
Album of 120 leaves, Ink and color on silk, 27.5 x 32.5 cm 32.5 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)
Drinking Cards with
Illustrations of the 48
Immortals
1854
Woodblock-printed book
29.8 x 13.2 cm
Private collection
Chen Hongshou (1599-1652),
Album of Landscapes and Figures
(detail),
Undated, Ming Dynasty,
Freer Gallery of Art
Ren Xiong (1823-1857)
Drinking Cards with
Illustrations of the 48
Immortals
1854
Woodblock-printed
book
29.8 x 13.2 cm
Private collection
Chen Hongshou
Ren Xun (1835-1893)
The Romance of the
Western Chamber
Undated,
one leaf from an
album of twelve,
ink and color on
paper
34 x 35.5 cm,
Palace Museum,
Beijing
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian,18401895) & Hu Yuan (Hu
Gongshou, 1823-1886)
Portrait of Gao Yong
1877, Qing Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and color
on paper
139 x 48.5 cm
Shanghai Museum
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian,1840-1895)
Five Successful Sons
1877, Qing Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and color on paper
181.5 x 95.1 cm
Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian, 1840-1895), Album of Figures, Flowers, and Birds, leaf 1,
1881-1882, Qing Dynasty, album of twelve leaves, ink and color on paper,
each leaf 31.5 x 36 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian, 1840-1895), Album of Figures, Flowers, and Birds, leaf 2,
1881-1882, Qing Dynasty, album of twelve leaves, ink and color on paper,
each leaf 31.5 x 36 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian, 1840-1895), Album of Figures, Flowers, and Birds, leaf 3, 1881-1882, Qing Dynasty,
album of twelve leaves, ink and color on paper, each leaf 31.5 x 36 cm, Palace Museum, Beijing
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian,18401895)
The Cold and Sour Official
(Portrait of Wu Changshi)
1888, Qing Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and
color on paper
164..2 x 74.6 cm
Zhejiang Provincial
Museum, Hangzhou
Ren Yi (Ren Bonian,18401895)
In the Cool Shade of the
Banana Tree
Datable to 1888, Qing
Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and
color on paper
129 x 58.9 cm
Zhejiang Provincial
Museum, Hangzhou
Xugu
(1823-1896)
Xugu (1823-1896), Album of Various Subjects, leaf 1, 1895, Qing Dynasty, album of ten leaves, ink and
color on paper, each leaf 34.7 x 40.6 cm, Shanghai Museum
Xugu (1823-1896), Album of Various Subjects, leaf 4, 1895, Qing Dynasty, album of ten leaves, ink and
color on paper, each leaf 34.7 x 40.6 cm, Shanghai Museum
Xugu (1823-1896), Album of Various Subjects, leaf 3, 1895, Qing Dynasty, album of ten leaves, ink and
color on paper, each leaf 34.7 x 40.6 cm, Shanghai Museum
Xugu (1823-1896), design for decorated letter paper,
Woodblock print, source: Xugu huaji, pl.151
Shanghai School of
Painting 3a:
Late Nineteenth
Century Figurative
and Commercial Art
Wu Jiayou
Qian Huian
Wu Jiayou
(Wu Youru, d. 1893)
Dianshizhai Pictorial
1887, no. 127
photolithography
Jin Gui, The Emperor and the
Examination Candidate,
1888
Dianshizhai Pictorial pull-out feature
Hand-colored photolithograph
Wu Jiayou (Wu Youru, d. 1893), Thief in the Flower Garden, 1891, Qing Dynasty, printed illustration
(offset lithography) for current-affairs section of Feiyingge huabao (“Fleeting Shadow Pavilion
Pictorial”) no 17 [issue 2 of the second lunar month] (1891), 25.5 x 12.8 cm, Private Collection
Wu Jiayou (Wu Youru, d. 1893), Women in the Twelve Months, leaf I, 1890, Qing Dynasty, album of
twelve leaves, ink and color on silk, each leaf 27.2 x 33.2 cm, Shanghai Museum
The Epigraphic School
Zhao Zhiqian (1829-1884)
Calligraphy in Various
Scripts, 3 & 4
1869, Qing Dynasty
Set of four hanging Scrolls,
Ink on paper
Each 143 x 37 cm
Shanghai Museum
Zhao Zhiqian (1829-1884)
The Book Collecting Cliff
Undated, Qing Dynasty
Hanging Scroll, Ink and
color on paper
69.5 x 39 cm
Shanghai Museum
Zhao Zhiqian (1829-1884), Flowers, leaf 1, 1859, Qing Dynasty, album of twelve leaves, ink and color on
paper, each leaf 22.4 x 31.5 cm, Shanghai Museum
Zhao Zhiqian (1829-1884), Flowers, leaf 2, 1859, Qing Dynasty, album of twelve leaves, ink and color on
paper, each leaf 22.4 x 31.5 cm, Shanghai Museum
Zhao Zhiqian (1829-1884), Flowers, leaf 6, 1859, Qing Dynasty, album of twelve leaves, ink and color on
paper, each leaf 22.4 x 31.5 cm, Shanghai Museum
Wu Junqing
(Wu Changshi, 1844-1927)
Wu Changshi
(1844-1927)
Stone Drum
Script, 1 & 2
1915
Set of four
hanging Scrolls,
Ink on paper
Each 150 x 40
cm
Shanghai
Institute of
Chinese
Painting
Wu Changshi (18441927)
Plum Blossoms 1927
Hanging scroll, Ink
and color on paper
Kuboso Collection
Wu Changshi (1844-1927)
Loquats and Wild Roses,
1920
Hanging Scroll
Ink and color on paper
151.1 x 82.8 cm
Shanghai Museum
Wang Zhen
(Wang Yiting, 1867-1938)
Wang Zhen (1867-1938)
Lotus and Birds
1918
Hanging Scroll, ink and
color on paper
178 x 82 cm
Collection of Michael
Y.W.Shin, Tainan
Wang Zhen
(Wang Yiting, 1867-1938)
Fate, 1922
Pair of hanging scrolls,
Ink on paper,
Each 120 x 61 cm,
Duoyunxuan, Shanghai
Wang Zhen
(Wang Yiting, 1867-1938)
Dragon and Clouds,
1920
Hanging scroll, ink on
paper,155 x 70 cm
Collection of Michael Y.
W. Shih, Tainan
VIS127C
Fall 2019
Art of Modern China
Tuesday & Thursday 3:30-4:50pm, Mandeville B210
Prof. Kuiyi Shen
Office: 365 Visual Arts Facilities
Tel: 858-534-6104
Office Hours: Thursday 2:30-3:30pm
E-Mail: kshen@ucsd.edu
Graduate Teaching Assistants
Wanshi Ma w3ma@ucsd.edu Ning Zhang n4zhang@ucsd.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will explore the ways in which Chinese artists of the 20th century have defined
modernity and their tradition against the complex background of China’s history. A key issue for
modern Chinese art is the degree to which Chinese artists have chosen to adopt Western
conventions and the extent to which they have rejected them. Equally legitimate positions have
been taken by artists whose work actively opposes the legacy of the past and by those who
pursue innovations based upon their particular understandings of the Chinese tradition. Through
examining art works in different media, including oil painting, graphic design, woodblock prints,
traditional ink and color painting, and recent installation and video art, along with theoretical
writing, bibliographical and institutional data, and other documentary materials, we will
investigate the most compelling of the multiple realities that Chinese artists have constructed for
themselves.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
You are expected to understand the main developments in Chinese art of the twentieth century in
terms of function and iconography, stylistic characteristics, historical significance, and political
and cultural implications, to improve critical thinking and writing skills, and to develop your
research abilities.
COURSE FORMAT
The class will be conducted as a series of slide-illustrated lectures. Each section of the material
will be presented chronologically, with detailed discussion of problems in interpretation,
connoisseurship, or methodology. You will be examined on slides shown in class; for this
reason, regular class attendance is expected.
COURSE REQUIREMENT AND GRADING
You are expected to become familiar with all the art works, facts, and concepts introduced in
class, as well as with facts and issues introduced in the textbook and in the assigned outs …
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