My professor is giving me a change to fix this paper. I am going to provide examples of the Behavioral Intervention Plan they are labeled. My paper that needs to be fixed is called BIP. I will also provide the rubric that she grade me on so you can focus on what to fix. Can you replace the word escapism with a different word. https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/fba/What a Behavioral Intervention Plan means: https://www.understood.org/en/learning-thinking-differences/treatments-approaches/educational-strategies/behavior-intervention-plans-what-you-need-to-knowRubric The ones that are bold faced are the points I got and it needs to be corrected.BeginningDevelopingProficientOutstandingGeneral DescriptionPoints:0 (0.00%)The general description is not provided and/or does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:3.75 (3.75%)The general description includes some of the required information and reflects limited understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:Reference definition of escapism. Behavior described is not measurable.Points:5.25 (5.25%)The general description includes most of the required information, and reflects an understanding and application of the course content.Points:7.5 (7.50%)The general description is thorough, complete and reflects a high level of understanding and application of the course content.SubjectPoints:0 (0.00%)The description of the student is not provided and/or does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:3.75 (3.75%)The description of the student includes some of the required information and reflects limited understanding and application of the course content.Points:5.25 (5.25%)The description of the student includes most of the required information, and reflects an understanding and application of the course content.Points:7.5 (7.50%)The description of the student is thorough, complete and reflects a high level of understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:5–Seventeen is very young to be a sophomore in college. Avoid using words like “loves” to describe what are perceived as the student’s preferences. Use objective rather than subjective terms, Race/ethnicity? Language status?SettingPoints:0 (0.00%)The description of the setting is not provided and/or does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:3.75 (3.75%)The description of the setting includes some of the required information and reflects limited understanding and application of the course content.Points:5.25 (5.25%)The description of the setting includes most of the required information, and reflects an understand and application of the course content.Points:7.5 (7.50%)The description of the setting is thorough, complete and reflects a high level of understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:6–will the plan be implemented all day, every day. If so, how would it be monitored?Target BehaviorPoints:0 (0.00%)Target behavior is not provided or is poorly/ inadequately defined. Product does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:6.25 (6.25%)Target behavior is broadly defined and a basic rationale is provided for why behavior change is needed. Product reflects limited understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:No information is provided that would enable one to identify when the behavior is occurring. Ignorance cannot be observed.Points:8.75 (8.75%)Target behavior is defined and a reasonable rationale is provided for why behavior change is needed. Product reflects an understanding and application of course content.Points:12.5 (12.50%)Target behavior is clearly defined such that an independent observer could recognize when it does and does not occur. Clear rationale is provided for why behavior change is needed. Product reflects a high level of understanding and application of course content.Baseline PhasePoints:0 (0.00%)The baseline phase is not described, no measure is provided reflecting current behavior, and/or A-B-C chart is not included. Product does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:6.25 (6.25%)The baseline phase is broadly described, a numeric measure is provided reflecting current behavior, and/or A-B-C chart includes some of the required information. Product reflects some understanding and application of the course content.Points:8.75 (8.75%)The baseline phase is mostly described, a numeric measure is provided reflecting current behavior, and/or A-B-C chart includes most of the required information. Product reflects an understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:7.5–This was generously graded based upon effort. Behavior 1 is not measurable and it unclear under which circumstances behavior 2 was occurring. Did someone literally follow him all day, every day?Points:12.5 (12.50%)The baseline phase is clearly described, a graphic representation is provided reflecting current behavior, and A-B-C chart includes all of the required information. Product reflects a high level of understanding and application of course content.Short-term ObjectivePoints:0 (0.00%)STO(s) is vague, subjective and includes one or fewer of the required elements (condition, behavior and criteria) and would not be useful in measuring progress in the area(s) of intervention. Product does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:6.25 (6.25%)STO includes two of the three required elements (condition, behavior and criteria) and is somewhat useful in measuring progress in the area(s) of intervention. Product reflects some understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:3–Does not include a condition or criteria. If he goes where his behavior cannot be noted, how would you note it?Points:8.75 (8.75%)STO(s) includes reference to the three required elements (condition, behavior and criteria) and is mostly useful in measuring progress in the area(s) of intervention. Product reflects an understanding and application of the course content.Points:12.5 (12.50%)STO(s) includes the three required elements (condition, behavior and criteria), is succinctly stated in one sentence, and is designed to accurately measure progress in the area(s) of intervention. Product reflects a high level of understanding and application of course content.InterventionPoints:0 (0.00%)The intervention phase is not described, does not include alternative interventions, and/or includes no references to the relevant literature. Product does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:6.25 (6.25%)The intervention phase is broadly described and includes one method of alternative intervention; no references to the relevant literature are provided. Product reflects some understanding and application of the course content.Points:8.75 (8.75%)The intervention phase is mostly described, includes two methods of alternative intervention, and one reference to the relevant literature. Product reflects an understanding and application of the course content.Points:12.5 (12.50%)The intervention is clearly described, includes two relevant alternative interventions and two references to the relevant literature. Product reflects a high level of understanding and application of course content.Feedback:10–again, generously graded.Progress MonitoringPoints:0 (0.00%)Method of progress monitoring is not described, does not enable comparison to baseline data, and/or does not include the chart/tool that will be used. Product does not reflect an understanding and application of the course content.Points:6.5 (6.50%)Method of progress monitoring is broadly described, enables some comparison to baseline data, and/or includes the chart/tool that will be used. Product reflects some understanding and application of the course content.Feedback:It is unclear what behavior is being measured or how this will compare to baseline. Very generously graded.Points:8.75 (8.75%)Method of progress monitoring is mostly described, enables comparison to baseline data, and includes the chart/tool that will be used. Product reflects an understanding and application of the course content.Points:12.5 (12.50%)Method of progress monitoring is clearly described, enables accurate comparison to baseline data, and includes an appropriately constructed chart/tool that will be used. Product reflects a high level of understanding and application of course content.Quality of WritingPoints:0 (0.00%)Product is incomprehensible and includes more than five mechanical errors (e.g., spelling, grammar, punctuation, use of person-first language, adherence to APA conventions).Points:7.5 (7.50%)Product is somewhat comprehensible and includes five or fewer mechanical errors (e.g., spelling, grammar, punctuation, use of person-first language, adherence to APA conventions).Feedback:Writing was very difficult to follow. Numerous mechanical errors ( in many cases the subjects name is not capitalized).Points:10.5 (10.50%)Product is comprehensible and includes no more than three mechanical errors (e.g., spelling, grammar, punctuation, use of person-first language, adherence to APA conventions).Points:15 (15.00%)Product is clearly and concisely written and includes no more than one mechanical error (e.g., spelling, grammar, punctuation, use of person-first language, adherence to APA conventions).The rubric total value of 66.50 has been overridden with a value of 59.75 out of 100.Name:BIP RubricDescription:This rubric will be used to evaluate your BIP. It contains all of the information included in the BIP Guidelines provided in class.
behavior_change_example_1__1_.docx
behavior_change_example_2_1___1_.docx
bip_this_one_needs_the_fixing_.docx
Unformatted Attachment Preview
Behavior Intervention/Change Plan (BIP)
General Description of the Problem:
Xavier is seventh grade student that has fixation with a female student in his
Adaptive Education classroom, named Mattie. Each morning, during the “All About
Me” segment, in which students share things about themselves and their lives,
Xavier reports that he likes Mattie. However, Xavier does not appropriately express
this. If he is allowed near Mattie, he behaves aggressively, attempting to bite or hit
her. Classroom staff members attempt to keep Xavier away from Mattie, but if he
sees a moment of opportunity, he will leave his seat and advance towards her.
According to former teachers, Xavier has demonstrated this type of behavior for a
number of years, showing favor towards a different female student each year.
Merely keeping Xavier away from Mattie is not teaching him how to appropriately
express his feelings for, and interact with those individuals that he favors. If Xavier
is not taught how to do this, he could potentially face very serious consequences in
the future.
Purpose of the Plan:
The purpose of this plan is to teach Xavier how to appropriately express his
feelings for, and interact with individuals he favors. In this case, Mattie is the
preferred individual. More appropriate methods of expression should replace the
aggressive behaviors that Xavier currently exhibits towards Mattie. These more
appropriate methods of expression could enable Xavier to more positively interact
with Mattie.
Subject:
Xavier is a thirteen year old boy diagnosed with autism and a mild intellectual
disability. He has a tall, stout build. He loves superheroes, chicken alfredo, and Olive
Garden.
There are two paraprofessionals working in Xavier’s Adaptive Education classroom.
One of these paraprofessionals works almost exclusively with Xavier. He is seated
by himself at the back of the classroom, because when seated by other students, he
does not keep his hands to himself or respect personal space.
Xavier engages in a number of self-stimulating behaviors. He can often be observed
rocking in his seat or hitting his hands against the back of his chair, or even against
the floor.
Xavier has exhibited aggression, including hitting and biting, towards other students
besides Mattie. He will also act aggressively towards teachers by swatting at
teachers, in attempts to hit them.
As previously explained, Xavier has a history of becoming fixated on female
classmates. It is unclear as to what characteristic(s) or qualities these female
students share or exhibit, in order to become the focus of his fixation. Mattie has
been the subject of Xavier’s fixation since the very beginning of the school year.
One of the most common misbehaviors that Xavier exhibits in the classroom is
constantly getting out of his seat. Xavier usually leaves his seat to approach Mattie.
When this occurs, classroom staff members position themselves to block Xavier’s
path to Mattie. Classroom staff members instruct Xavier to return to his seat. Xavier
usually ignores these instructions, and classroom staff members must physically
guide him back to his seat. When Xavier is denied access to Mattie, he becomes
frustrated. He will yell, throw himself onto the floor, swat at classroom staff
members, and even attempt to flee the classroom. If Xavier is able to leave his seat
and reach Mattie before classroom staff members intervene, Xavier will hit or bite
her. These behaviors are contradictory. Xavier frequently talks about how much he
likes Mattie. He is very attentive to her in class, often staring and smiling in her
direction. He will also try to initiate conversation with her from his seat across the
classroom. For instance, if he feels that he has done something good, he will ask her,
“Mattie, are you proud of me?”
However, due to the aggressive behaviors and the excessive attention Xavier directs
towards Mattie, Mattie views Xavier negatively. She speaks negatively about him to
the classroom staff members and other students in the classroom. Most of the other
students in the classroom similarly view Xavier negatively, and speak negatively
about him.
Furthermore, in class, Xavier hardly attends to instruction or assignments. His
entire focus is on Mattie.
Setting:
The intervention will be implemented daily in Xavier’s Adaptive Education
classroom, which has eleven sixth and seventh grade students. The intervention will
primarily be implemented by the special education teacher and the two
paraprofessionals working in the classroom. A counselor and school administrators
may also play a role in the implementation of the intervention plan. Mattie will also
be a participant in the intervention.
Target Behavior:
Target Behavior: Xavier will leave his seat and charge towards a female student he
favors, and will inappropriately exhibit aggressive behaviors, such as hitting and
biting, if he is able to get within reach of her.
This was chosen as the target behavior, because Xavier’s behavior could be harmful
to Mattie. A pattern of this type of behavior, without proper social skills instruction
could also have very negative consequence for Xavier in the future. Xavier’s
demonstrates a behavior deficit. He does not have the appropriate social skills to
communicate positively with Mattie, and to develop positive relationships. He needs
to receive explicit social skills instruction, which will enable him to communicate
and interact more positively with others.
Additionally, Xavier is so intent on reaching Mattie and interacting with her, that he
is not attentive to instruction. His attempts to reach Mattie are also disruptive to the
other students in the classroom, and these disruptive behaviors are occurring
frequently each day.
Baseline:
Measure of Target Behavior
Xavier’s behavior was observed over one week, and data was collected on the
frequency of his target behavior each day. Data was collected for the occurrence of
his target behavior, which consists of two interrelated behaviors.
Behavior #1: Xavier attempts to leave his seat and approach Mattie.
Behavior #2: Xavier reaches Mattie and exhibits aggressive behaviors towards her,
such as hitting or biting.
*This behavior is usually dependent upon Xavier leaving his seat and
approaching Mattie. Because classroom staff members block his efforts to
reach her, this behavior is not always exhibited.
Graph:
The data collected daily, over a two week period for both behaviors was graphed as
follows.
Behavior Frequency Data
Week 1
FREQUENCY OF BEHAVIOR
6
5
5
5
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
Monday
Tuesday
0
1
0
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
DAY OF THE WEEK
Behavior 1
Behavior 2
Student’s Current Performance:
Data collected every day for one week, determined that Xavier exhibited Behavior 1,
(leaving his seat in attempt to approach Mattie), an average of four times each day.
Xavier exhibited Behavior 2, (reaching Mattie and behaving aggressively towards
her by hitting or biting) an average of one time each day.
The graph also suggests that Xavier made more attempts to leave his seat and
approach Mattie at the very beginning and end of the week.
A-B-C Analysis:
One occurrence of the target behavior as exhibited each day is analyzed. These
occurrences represent a variety of contexts and circumstances.
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Context or
Circumstances
Entering the
classroom,
approximately
9:00 a.m.
During the
morning
routine,
approximately
9:30 a.m.
During
Independent
Work Time,
approximately
2:00 p.m.
End of the
school day,
before
dismissal,
approximately
3:50 p.m.
Transition
period between
morning
routine and
math
instruction,
approximately
10:00 a.m.
Antecedent
Xavier enters the
classroom, with
the
paraprofessional
that works with
him following
closely behind.
Mattie is already
seated in the
classroom. Xavier
is instructed sit in
his assigned seat.
The teacher is
speaking to the
entire class. She
has been
speaking for
some time.
Xavier is not
attending, but
looking around
the classroom.
He is squirming
in his seat.
Students are
working
independently.
Xavier is not
working on his
assignment.
Students sit
silently and
idly waiting for
dismissal.
Classroom
staff members
are sitting at
their desks,
quietly looking
over papers, at
electronic
devices, etc.
Classroom staff
members assist
the teacher in
preparing
instructional
materials for
the math
lesson. The
students sit
idly, waiting for
directions.
Behavior
Xavier walks past
his assigned seat,
then breaks into a
run towards
Mattie’s seat
Xavier stands up
while the
teacher is
talking, and
begins walking
in Mattie’s
direction with a
smile on his
face.
Xavier stares
at Mattie, then
begins to
slowly leave
his seat to
advance in her
direction.
Xavier stands
up, and begins
walking in
Mattie’s
direction.
Xavier leaves
his seat,
running
towards Mattie.
Xavier reaches
Mattie, grabs
her, and bites
her.
Consequence
One
paraprofessional
blocks Xavier
from reaching
Mattie. The
paraprofessional
that works with
Xavier physically
guides Xavier
back to his seat.
Xavier yells and
swats at the
paraprofessional.
The teacher
blocks his path.
Xavier smiles
and attempts to
reach Mattie
from a different
direction. The
teacher block
Xavier again.
Xavier is
physically
guided to his
seat.
A paraprofessional
observes this,
physically
guides Xavier
back to his
seat, and gets
Xavier started
on the
assignment.
The teacher
quickly leaves
her desk to
block Xavier
and to order
him back to his
seat.
Xavier is
physically
guided back to
his seat and is
administered a
strike as
punishment.
Chart adapted from:
Flick, G.L. (2011). Understanding and managing emotional and behavioral disorders
in the classroom. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education Inc.
Xavier demonstrates the target behavior in a number of contexts, and at a variety of
times throughout the day, but particularly during less structured times, when he is
able to advance towards her with less resistance. Xavier is never provided
corrective feedback, in terms of his attempts to reach Mattie. There are never any
real consequences for his attempts to run towards Mattie. In some cases, the
attempts of the classroom staff to block him from Mattie seem to make her more
desirable to him.
Xavier currently has no opportunity to interact with Mattie, and he is not being
taught more appropriate and acceptable behaviors for interacting with her.
Short-term Objective:
Given video modeling, practice, and coaching, Xavier will appropriately interact with
Mattie, under the supervision of classroom staff, using a verbal greeting and thumbs
up, during at least two of three attempts each day, by the fourth week of the
intervention.
Intervention:
Primary Intervention:
Video Modeling
Xavier’s target behavior seeks Mattie’s attention, and interaction with Mattie. Xavier
leaves his seat and approaches Mattie to receive this attention and interaction he
desires from her. Xavier behaves aggressively towards Mattie, lacking the ability to
more appropriately communicate and interact with her. Video modeling will be
used to teach Xavier how to appropriately greet Mattie using a verbal greeting and
high-five, and Xavier will have the opportunity to practice these skills and positively
interact with Mattie.
The National Professional Development Center on ASD (NPDC), lists video modeling
as an evidence-based practice for teaching individuals with autism (2014). There
are three types of video modeling (NPDC, 2010). Video prompting will be the type of
video modeling used for this intervention. Another individual, other than the
student, will be recorded exhibiting the behavior to be acquired (NPDC, 2010). This
behavior will be broken into steps, and be recorded with pauses after each step,
allowing the student to practice and master each step of the behavior NPDC, 2010).
In this case, another individual (classroom staff member or student) will be
recorded approaching Mattie in the classroom, leaving Mattie an appropriate
amount of personal space, telling Mattie hello, and giving Mattie a thumbs up,
waiting for Mattie’s response, and then leaving the Mattie for his or her seat. Xavier
will be able to view this video, and practice each step of the behavior.
Resources:
National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (2010).
Evidenced-based practice brief: Video modeling. Retrieved from
http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/sites/autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/files/imce/docu
ments/VideoModeling_Complete.pdf
Procedures for Implementation:
*Before implementing this intervention, consent should likely be obtained from
Mattie for her participation in the intervention.
Making the Video:
1) Equipment must be selected and acquired for recording and viewing the
video (NPDC, 2010). For this intervention, the classroom’s iPad will be used
to record the video. The video can be viewed on the iPad, uploaded from the
iPad to a classroom computer, or displayed on the Smart Board from the
iPad.
2) An individual will be selected to appear in the video, modeling the behavior
(NPDC, 2010). In this case, the paraprofessional that works with Xavier was
selected to appear in the video and model the appropriate behavior.
3) The selected individual will be shown exactly how to model the appropriate
behavior, with respect to the steps of task analysis (NPDC, 2010).The
paraprofessional will be shown the exact procedure for modeling the
behavior, with specific sub-steps in mind:
1) Approach Mattie
2) Stop in front of Mattie, giving her enough personal space
3) Tell Mattie hello
4) Give Mattie a thumbs up
5) Wait for Mattie’s response
6) Walk away from Mattie
7) Return to seat
4) Record a quality video (NPDC, 2010).
5) Edit the video, removing errors if necessary (NPDC, 2010).
6) Complete voice-overs, to narrate the steps for exhibiting the behavior (NPDC,
2010).
Viewing of the Video and Practice:
Xavier will view the video daily, proceeding practice opportunities.
1) The teacher will play the video for Xavier to view, within the classroom
(NPDC, 2010).
2) The teacher may play the video for Xavier several times, before expecting
Xavier to demonstrate the behavior himself (NPDC, 2010).
3) Eventually, the teacher will pause the video after each step of the modeled
behavior, and ask Xavier to practice each step of the behavior (NPDC, 2010).
The behavior being taught should be practiced in a natural setting at functional
times (NPDC, 2010). In this case, the behavior will be practiced in the classroom
several times each day, at times when it would be appropriate for Xavier to greet
Mattie.
The first opportunity will take place when Mattie enters the classroom and takes
her seat at the beginning of the school day each morning. The second
opportunity will occur when Mattie enters the classroom after lunch and takes
her seat. The third opportunity will take place as students wait in their seats to
leave the classroom at the end of the day. The teacher will prepare Mattie before
these practice opportunities begin. Mattie will know when the opportunities are
going to occur, and how to appropriately respond.
The classroom staff may provide prompts to Xavier during these practice
opportunities, as necessary. Interacting with Mattie should be reinforcing for
Xavier.
Progress monitoring data will be collected during this stage of the intervention,
to determine whether or not Xavier is meeting the criterion of his short-term
objective.
Fading:
Gradually, if Xavier is showing progress, the video, prompts, and reinforcements
should be faded. Video fading can occur by gradually showing less of the video.
This can be accomplished via three different methods: delaying start/premature
stop, error correction, or scene fading (NPDC, 2010). The first method, delaying
start/premature stop, starts the video later, or ends the video early (NPDC,
2010). Error correction displays only those parts the student is struggling with,
and scene fading removes parts of the video that the student has mastered
(NPDC, 2010).
Opportunities for Further Instruction:
If video modeling is successful, it could also be used to teach other
communication and social skills, allowing Xavier to engage in other types of
interactions (i.e. initiating or maintaining a conversation), and to continually
improve his ability to appropriately communicate and interact with others.
Resources:
National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (2010).
Evidenced-based practice brief: Video modeling. Retrieved from
http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/sites/autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/files/imce/docu
ments/VideoModeling_Complete.pdf
Additional Treatments:
If video modeling is not effective for teaching Xavier the appropriate social skills to
promote positive interactions with Mattie, the following strategies could also be
utilized.
Social Stories
Social stories, or Social narratives, are another evidenced-based practice for
teaching social skills to students with autism (NPDC, 2010). Social narratives
address a specific social behavior for change, in order to produce positive outcomes,
including positive social interactions (NPDC, 2010). Social narratives are
individualized for the student with which it will be used NPDC, 2010). They are
written in language that the student will understand, written at an appropriate
length for the student, and are often written from the first-person perspective
(NPDC, 2010). The narratives can also be customized with pictures, oftentimes
pictures of the student (NPDC, 2010). The social narrative is read daily by the
teacher or student, and incorporated into the student’s routine (NPDC, 2010).
A social narrative could be created for Xavier, to teach the same behavior addressed
in the video modeling intervention. If Xavier was not responding and demonstrating
progress with video modeling, it could be the case that presenting the social skills
instruction in a different medium would be more effective.
Resources:
National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (2010).
Evidence-based practice brief: Social narratives. Retrieved from
http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/sites/autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/files/imce/docu
ments/Social-Narratives-Complete-10-2010.pdf
Visual Supports
Visual supports can be developed for Xavier with reminders related to his
interactions with Mattie, or social rules to govern his interactions with Mattie. These
reminders or rules clearly state appropriate social behaviors. The visual supports
can be displayed in a variety of formats, and could easily be adapted to a format
which would be most accessible and convenient for Xavier.
Resources:
Storey, K., Haymes, L., Post, M., Loughrey, T. (n.d.). Understanding stalking behavior
by individuals with ASD [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from
http://registration.ocali.org/rms_event_sess_handout/5490_Handout.pdf
Progress Monitoring:
Interval and frequency data will be collected to evaluate the effectiveness of the
intervention.
Interval data will demonstrate whether or not Xavier is on-track to meet the shortterm objective, with respect to the criterion of the objective. According to the
criterion, Xavier must perform the behavior specified by the objective during at
least two out of three attempts each day. Interval data will be collected which notes
whether or not Xavier performs the specified behavior during the appropriate
interval, which is within each scheduled opportunity for interaction. There are three
opportunities, and the behavior must be exhibited during at least two opportunities
each day by the fourth week of the intervention, in order to meet the objective.
The following graph displays a trend-line that can be used to determine whether or
not Xavier is making progress to meet the criterion of his short-term objective.
NUMBER OF TIMES BEHAVIOR OCCURS DAILY
Progress Towards Short-Term Objective
2.5
2
2
2
2
2
M
T
W
Th
F
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
0
M
T
W

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